Staging an Exhibition

Today I helped staging an exhibition, Alternative Facts, that is being displayed at the School of Art from the 22 May until 29 September. This exhibition were a part of my undergraduate module “Staging an Exhibition” held by Harry Heuser. In the beginning of this semester, we chose three objects each and throughout this module, we have been taught how to write labels, introductory text panels and how to display the artwork.

Alternative Facts poster

If you are interested, you are very welcome to come and take a look at our exhibition!

Trying to Get Everything Done

This is the last weekend before our deadline, and now we are trying our best to get everything done in time. I still have a bit of work to do on my paintings, but at least I can see them getting finished.
This semester I have focused on the darkness and the light of my living room, and have tried to capture it into these four different paintings. I started the darkest one of them when it was still winter, and the lightest one is the most recent one, reflecting the light that summer is bringing.

I also have a bit of printmaking to finish, so I will try to get up early tomorrow and stay the whole day in school, hoping to make some good prints out of my plates.

Stone Litography

This semester I have had printmaking along with painting and here are some pictures of the processes I have learned to work with, stone lithography.

When I started printmaking I had not heard of stone litography before, and did not know how it worked, but I really like this process now – it is basically like drawing and painting. One thing I am still not used to (and that goes for all printmaking processes) is that the image will be mirrored from the original drawing.
Stone lithography was invented in the 18th century and was the first process to make it possible to “draw” and “paint” an image onto a flat surface. The basic of what you do are:

  1. Draw on the stone with something greasy, like a litho crayon or pencil.
  2. Add a little water to the stone, so the parts of the stone that are not greasy get wet.
  3. Roll an oil-based ink onto the stone, this way the greasy parts will pick up ink.
  4. Press a piece of paper to the stone to transfer ink from the stone.

There are more steps in the process than this, but this is the easy explanation. I will post more pictures of my final prints soon.

Pottery

This is the first time I am trying pottery. I started this semester, at the end of January, in a class called “Pottery for Beginners” at the Arts Centre in Aberystwyth. It runs every Monday evening from 6.30 pm to 9.00 pm and is held by Laura Hughes.


My works so far:

This vase was made using the slab method – it consists of nine parts pieced together. In the first picture you can see the vase after its first firing, bisque firing, and in the second picture it has been glazed and is ready to be fired again, glaze firing.

This bowl is the first one I made, and is made using the pinch pot method. You start of with a lump of clay, making it round and smooth before making a hole in the midle and then pinching the clay from every side until it is the shape you want it to be. This bowl is supposed to be brown on the outside and green on the inside, but it is also covered in glaze – on its way to be glaze fired.

This is my first mug made by the throwing technique, probably what most people associate with pottery, where you thrown a lump of clay (smooth and round) onto a wheel that you spin while forming the lump with both hands. It’s not as easy as it looks! First state, not been fired yet –  it is now you paint it.

This bowl is made with the pinch pot method after a failed attempt to throw. Also in the first state and ready to be bisque fired.

I have also a bowl made by the coil method, but I didn’t take a picture of it since it is not very good. Using that method you make the clay into sausage shapes and build up a vase, bowl, mug (or whatever you like) out of these sausages and smooth it afterwards with damp sponges.

Luckily I still have a few classes left so I am looking forward to making more pottery. It is a nice way to spend an evening – relaxing and creative.

Inspiration in Welshpool

Yesterday, Luciana and I had to take the train to Welshpool to get our National Insurance Numbers. While we were there we decided that we might as well to do some sightseeing so we went to see the Powis Castle – a medieval castle build around 1200. Since it was such a lovely and nice day (rain) we only went to see the inside of the castle, but it is supposed to be an amazing garden there with plants from all over the world.

Both of us got a National Trust membership, so now we can visit as many places as possible within a year – I will try to do my best!

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Except the weather (I have almost got used to it by now) it was a really great and interesting day – I got lots of inspiration for my paintings and even did a few sketches.

Paint a Legend!

Last semester and up until now I have been doing a Lifelong Learning course called Museum and Gallery Education and Interpretation along with my Fine Art degree. And today we had our final task in this course; we held a workshop in the National Library of Wales! (“We” being Luciana and myself). There were different workshops held throughout the whole week by other students in our class, all of them with the theme of legends. Some of the workshops included clay, lego and costumes – we held one called Paint a Legend. It was a little bit of preparation for this, since it was two hours long and the children between five and ten years old.


First we showed a powerpoint including a story of King Arthur and pictures of legends. The story was read by two members of Aberystwyth University Medieval Re-Enactment Society, one knight and one lady, that were so kind to show up all dressed up (even with the proper underwear!) and stay during the workshop. After the powerpoint the children could chose what they wanted to do: colour-in drawing of legends or do painting in the wet room. They made some really good paintings – I was impressed!

This was not something we had to do for this course, holding the workshop was voluntary, but I am so happy that I did! It was a very good experience that I will take with me into my further education and future jobs. The children were so happy doing something creative within the local community and it was a very fun being a part of this!